THE CANADIAN ARCTIC EXPEDITION 1913-1918

The Canadian Arctic Expedition of 1913-1918 represents an epic adventure unique in Canada’s history. A band of intrepid scientists and explorers embarked on a dangerous and compelling journey. Scientists documented flora and fauna of the North while explorers pushed ahead into new and undiscovered territory. The expedition left a scientific legacy

that is still relevant and resonates today.

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FEATURES

80 Degrees North is an interactive, curriculum-connected, digital resource that explores a unique event in Canadian history. The content is freely accessible in English and French to teachers across Canada.

Teacher Resources

Comprehensive suite of curriculum-connected, pedagogical content that examines History, Social Studies, and Aboriginal Studies.

Free

80 Degrees North is freely accessible

to all students and teachers.

Target Audience

Unique content recommended

for students in Grades 9-12.

Bilingual

All content of this resource is

available in English and French.

Graphic Novel

Evocative illustrations depict the events

of the expedition and examine the life

of the Copper Inuit peoples.

Interactive

Featuring original videos with
subject matter experts. Majestic
and exhilarating soundtrack. Hidden collectibles throughout the narrative. Tablet, mobile, and iPad-friendly.

KEY THEMES OF 80 DEGREES NORTH

EXPEDITION

The Canadian Arctic Expedition (CAE) of 1913-1918 was sponsored by the Canadian Government. The expedition was divided into two parties, the Northern and Southern. The Northern Party was tasked to explore north of Alaska, chart and map territories, and discover new lands while claiming them for the Crown. The Southern Party’s mandate focused on examining the wildlife and plant life of the Arctic region and interact with Copper Inuit communities and document their culture, customs, and way of life. The physical challenges were daunting and as a result, 17 members perished during the course of the CAE.

Vilhjalmur Stefansson became the overall leader of the Canadian Arctic Expedition. His second-in-command was
Dr. Rudolph Anderson, an American zoologist. Although
a consummate Arctic explorer, Stefansson could be imperious and impulsive. Dr. Anderson, a former military man, was professional, detail-oriented, and organized. He and Stefansson often clashed during the expedition. Two other significant figures were, Diamond Jenness, the ethnologist who studied the Copper Inuit and produced a large portion of the scientific research and George Wilkins, photographer and cinematographer, who documented much of the activities of the CAE.

KEY PLAYERS

THE INUIT

Stefansson had enormous respect for the Inuit and appreciated their culture. He spoke the language and hired many men and women from the community to work on the expedition as trappers, hunters, cooks, and seamstresses. It is fair to say that the CAE likely wouldn’t have been successful without the direct involvement of Inuit men and women as part of the overall team. Much became known of the Copper Inuit due to the extensive study and research undertaken by ethnologist, Diamond Jenness. He lived and travelled extensively with the Copper Inuit and documented their customs in great detail.

Prior to the launch of the CAE, it was thought that an uncharted continent lay to the north of Alaska. This turned out to be not true. Yet, Stefansson and his team did discover new, undocumented lands and islands, mapped many coastlines, rivers and river basins, adding to the knowledge of an area that had remained a question mark until that time. The Southern Party scientists captured and documented many animal species, plant life, mapped and charted territories, and along with the research of Diamond Jenness, provided a detailed and lasting scientific legacy for Canada and Canadians.

DISCOVERY

HISTORICAL TIMELINE

Important dates of the Canadian Arctic Expedition 1913-1918

June 17, 1913

The Canadian Arctic Expedition begins. The Karluk sails from Esquimalt for Nome, Alaska and the Arctic

1913

1914

September 19, 1913

Vilhjalmur Stefansson, the Expedition Leader, leaves the Karluk and its crew to go hunting and
is unable to return

January 21, 1914

Survivors beginning leaving “Shipwreck Camp”
to look for a suitable place to set up camp

September 7, 1914

The survivors are finally rescued by the King and Winge ship

The Karluk becomes trapped in ice

August 12, 1913

The Karluk sinks into the Chukchi Sea

January 10, 1914

Captain Bartlett heads to Siberia to seek rescue of the survivors

March 18, 1914

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OUR TEAM

Meet the people that made this project possible.

Janal Bechthold

COMPOSER

A multi-talented musician and composer. She composed all of the music for the video soundtracks as well as the interactive graphic novel.

Steve Ferguson

CONTENT CREATOR/MEDIA PRODUCER

An experienced video director and editor, Steve has worked on a number of interactive projects for TEACH and is responsible for the creation of the
80 Degrees North video series.

David Gray

SUBJECT MATTER EXPERT

An accomplished arctic biologist with extensive Arctic exploration and film making experience. David provided insight as a consultant to the project.

Tommy Guignard

TRANSLATOR

Tommy is a certified translator

based in Montreal who is also studying biogeography. He has translated many documents and projects for TEACH over the years, including 80 Degrees North.

Susan Hughes

CURRICULUM WRITER

A published author and curriculum resource developer. She wrote the lesson plans for 80 Degrees North.

Stuart Jenness

SUBJECT MATTER EXPERT

Acted as scientific editor for the Geological Survey of Canada and is the son of Diamond Jenness, the CAE’s ethnologist. Stuart is one of the foremost experts on the CAE providing his knowledge and expertise to the project.

Rob King

DEVELOPER

A multi-talented programmer whose expertise include, developing interactive experiences and artworks for creative, research, and ad organizations.

Katryna Kozbiel

ART DIRECTOR

An experienced graphic designer with
an eye for detail. Kat designed 80 Degrees North book, websites and other print
and marketing collateral for this project.

Wili Liberman

WRITER/PRODUCER

The founding Editor and Publisher

of TEACH Magazine. He wrote the text for the graphic novel on the 80 Degrees North Project and acted as overall producer and project administrator.

David Morrison

SUBJECT MATTER EXPERT

The curator of Northwest Territories Archaeology at the Canadian Museum of History and has completed extensive field work in the Arctic. David acted as an expert consultant to 80 Degrees North.

Kent Parker

VIDEO PRODUCER

A Broadcast Producer with over 20 years experience, Kent was responsible for overseeing all aspects of production for the 80 Degrees North video series.

Lisa Tran

PROJECT MANAGER / EDITOR

As the associate Editor of TEACH,

Lisa has worked on many educational interactive projects, including The Ruptured Sky and The Shadowed Road.

Colin Turner

ILLUSTRATOR

A fine artist, illustrator, and painter.

He teaches art in his hometown of Vancouver. Colin illustrated the

interactive graphic novel.

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